Mid-Year Freak Out Book Tag

I can’t believe that we are already at the half year point for 2020 especially with the majority of this year gone to a pandemic. My challenge to myself this year was to complete the Goodreads 52 books around the year challenge. I have read 52 books so far yet not all of those books fell into a category on that list which is okay so now my goal is 62 books for the year. I am secretly hoping to hit 100 books this year but I don’t want to fall short and disappoint myself.

I’m very happy to share with you some of the books that I have really enjoyed and my anticipated reads. Thanks to Raes Reading Corner for tagging me, you can find her respond to this tag here: https://raesreadingcorner726922248.wordpress.com/2020/07/02/mid-year-freak-out-book-tag-2020/

1. Best Book you’ve Read so far in 2020:

I thought a lot about which one to put in this category as I have read so many great books just in these last few months. I had to go with Lobizona by Romina Garber though. (coming out August 4th)

This book does a good job with what it means to challenge the rules and what it means to deserve to live. I liked the way that it handled that topic both in our world and in the world built by the book. I think this book did a great job bringing the issue of what it means to belong somewhere to the surface.

2. Best Sequel you’ve Read so far in 2020:

I actually have only read one sequel so far this year which is surprising to me as I used to only read series. This year the only sequel I read was Tunnel of Bones by Victoria Schwab. I’m hoping to read more sequels so maybe by the end of the year this won’t be the only one.

3. New Release you Haven’t Read Yet But Want to:

This one was an easy pick even if there are so many new releases on my shelf that I need to read. I’ve heard nothing but great things about this book and I’m hoping to get to it this month for Transathon.




4. Most Anticipated Release for the Second Half of the Year

Into the Real - Z Brewer - Hardcover

There are so many books coming out in the second half of this year that I can’t wait to get my hands on. There is one that I have been waiting for since it was announced very early this year.

Z Brewer is one of my favorite authors and has been since I got back into reading Young Adult as an adult. This book has a genderqueer character who I can’t wait to meet as I love all of their other characters.

5. Biggest Disappointment:

I would have to say almost everything that we read for my libraries book club this year. I just didn’t connect with a lot of the readings and then some were just really complicated for me to follow. The libraries book club is the rare time in which I try to read adult fiction and really struggle with it.

6. Biggest Surprise:

I was pleasantly surprised by Something to Talk About by Meryl Wilsner. When looking at my shelves I notice that I hardly ever read romance and there’s no reason for that. I read a lot of YA that has romance as it’s central plot but not much adult romance. I received this book from the publisher though and as it is an F/F romance I wanted to give it a try. I really enjoyed this book and liked that it was a slow burn romance book. I think that if I were to try and read romance novels they would have to be slow burn or friends to lovers.

7. Favorite New Author (debut or new to you):

There are so many new to me authors that I have read this year and have enjoyed. I think I would have to go with Junauda Petrus who wrote ‘The Stars and the Blackness Between Them’ as my favorite debut author for what I’ve read so far this year. I really enjoyed the way the characters in this story were written and the ways in which each emotion played out.

8. Newest Fictional Crush

I can’t really think of any character that I would say I have a crush on. The characters in my books tend to all be children that I want to protect. So there are many of them that I am amazed by and in awe of but none that I am crushing on.

9. Newest Favorite Character;

There are way too many that I just love and want to be friends with, or live in their world amongst them. I love Manu from Lobizona and the complexity of all her identities. I love how you get to see her in two different settings and while she grows as a character she is still the same person that she always was.

I also really like Soraya and Parveneh from Girl, Serpent, Thorn and how loyal they are to the people that they care about. I love how Soraya learns more about herself throughout the book and how what she learns adds to who she is. I also really like the strength that these two characters lend to each other.

10. Book That Made You Cry:

A lot of books have made me cry this year and I don’t know if it is because I read sad books when I’m more emotional or if this pandemic made me emotional. It can also be that these books are just sad or maybe I just cry very easily. It isn’t always sad books that make me cry though, books that I connect with are the worst when it comes to making me cry.

The most recent book that made me cry about something that I hadn’t let myself process was ‘We are Okay’ by Nina LaCour.

11. Book That Made You Happy:

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I read George by Alex Gino a while ago so when I saw this book I knew I had to read it. I hadn’t been reading physical books and there were no books that were getting my mind off something that had recently happened in my family. I picked this book up hoping to get through a few pages and I finished it over the weekend. It was such a cute read and the relationship that Rick had with his grandpa cheered me up.

12. Favourite book-to-film adaptation you saw this year:

I don’t think that I have seen any book-to-film movie adaptations this year. I have mostly been watching a lot of tv shows and the closest I get to this is Love, Victor which I loved.

13. Favourite review you’ve written this year:

I think I would have to go with my review for ‘We are Not From Here’ by Jenny Torres Sanchez. The writing of that review made me reflect on the privilege that I have by being a U.S citizen whose parents speak english and are also U.S. citizens. It was a book that I really enjoyed in which I learned a lot from.

14. Most beautiful book you’ve bought (or received) so far this year:

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So many of the books that I have received this year are beautiful. I think I would have to go with ‘Ghost Squad’ by Claribel A. Ortega which was gifted to me.



15. What books do you want to read by the end of the year?

There are so many that I am hoping to read by the end of this year but to name a few:

The Living Dead by George A. Romero and Daniel Kraus

Felix Ever After by Kacen Callender

Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas

Red, White, and Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston

Some of these questions were really challenging but I did enjoy looking back at everything that I read this year. It was especially interesting to compare the first two months of reading when I was commuting to work to what I read now as I work from home. I tag any of you who want to do this tag.

Transathon TBR

For this month I decided that I wanted to take part in my first readathon and Transathon takes place this month. There are so many books that I have by Transgender/Non-Binary authors that I want to read and this is the perfect excuse to prioritize those books. There are some prompts that I don’t have a book for yet so feel free to recommend one to me. Also feel free to tell me if I put a book in the wrong category.

The prompts and what I am reading for each prompt are as follows:

A book written by a Trans woman

Ciel by Sophie Labelle

Ciel is excited to start high school. A gender non-conforming trans kid, Ciel has a YouTube channel and dreams of getting a better camera to really make a mark. Ciel can always rely on their best friend, Stephie, a trans girl who also happens to be a huge nerd, but their friendship begins to feel distant when Stephie makes it clear she wants the fact that she’s trans to be more invisible in high school. While navigating this new friendship dynamic, Ciel is also trying to make a long-distance relationship work with their boyfriend Eirikur, who just moved back to Iceland. When Ciel befriends Liam, a new trans boy at school, things become more complicated by the minute.

A book written by a non-binary person

Madness by Z Brewer 

Brooke Danvers is pretending to be fine. She’s gotten so good at pretending that they’re letting her leave inpatient therapy. Now she just has to fake it long enough for her parents and teachers to let their guard down. This time, when she’s ready to end her life, there won’t be anyone around to stop her.

Then Brooke meets Derek. Derek is the only person who really gets what Brooke is going through, because he’s going through it too. As they start spending more time together, Brooke suddenly finds herself having something to look forward to every day and maybe even happiness.

But when Derek’s feelings for her intensify, Brooke is forced to accept that the same relationship that is bringing out the best in her might be bringing out the worst in Derek—and that Derek at his worst could be capable of real darkness. 

Rick by Alex Gino 

Rick’s never questioned much. He’s gone along with his best friend Jeff even when Jeff’s acted like a bully and a jerk. He’s let his father joke with him about which hot girls he might want to date even though that kind of talk always makes him uncomfortable. And he hasn’t given his own identity much thought, because everyone else around him seemed to have figured it out.

But now Rick’s gotten to middle school, and new doors are opening. One of them leads to the school’s Rainbow Spectrum club, where kids of many genders and identities congregate, including Melissa, the girl who sits in front of Rick in class and seems to have her life together. Rick wants his own life to be that … understood. Even if it means breaking some old friendships and making some new ones.

As they did in their groundbreaking novel George, in Rick, award-winning author Alex Gino explores what it means to search for your own place in the world … and all the steps you and the people around you need to take in order to get where you need to be.

A book written by a trans man

Trans Mission: My Quest to a Beard by Alex Bertie 

Being a teenager is difficult enough, but having to go through puberty whilst realising you’re in the wrong body means dealing with a whole new set of problems: bullying, self-doubt and in some cases facing a physical and medical transition.

Alex is an ordinary teenager: he likes pugs, donuts, retro video games and he sleeps with his socks on. He’s also transgender, and was born female. He’s been living as a male for the past few years and he has recently started his physical transition.

Throughout this book, Alex will share what it means to be in his shoes, as well as his personal advice to other trans teens. Above all, he will show you that every step in his transition is another step towards happiness. This is an important and positive book, a heart-warming coming-of-age memoir with a broad appeal.

A book with a trans MC

Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas 

Yadriel has summoned a ghost, and now he can’t get rid of him.

When his traditional Latinx family has problems accepting his gender, Yadriel becomes determined to prove himself a real brujo. With the help of his cousin and best friend Maritza, he performs the ritual himself, and then sets out to find the ghost of his murdered cousin and set it free.

However, the ghost he summons is actually Julian Diaz, the school’s resident bad boy, and Julian is not about to go quietly into death. He’s determined to find out what happened and tie up some loose ends before he leaves. Left with no choice, Yadriel agrees to help Julian, so that they can both get what they want. But the longer Yadriel spends with Julian, the less he wants to let him leave.

A non-fiction trans book

I don’t have a selection for this prompt yet

A book with a non-binary MC

Ciel by Sophie Labelle

A book with multiple trans characters

Ciel by Sophie Labelle

A book with the words trans in the title

Trans Mission: My Quest to a Beard by Alex Bertie 

A graphic novel with a trans character

I don’t have a selection for this prompt yet

April Wrap Up

I had planned on reading a lot more this month but I didn’t expect for the quarantine to change what I wanted to read. I’ve wanted to read a lot more light books and middle grade is perfect for that. I got a chance to read several middle grade and YA books this month and have decided that it’s best for me to stick with genres that I love. Click the links to read my full review of these books.

Big Lies in a Small Town

I decided to listen to this one on audio while following along with the book and I’m glad that I chose to do this. The very detailed descriptions of this book lend themselves well to an audiobook, I really enjoyed relaxing and trying to see the story. The narrator for this book made it easy to listen to and it was a soothing listen during these weird times. I also liked how there was one narrator but she goes along with each of the girl’s personalities so you can tell who is speaking.

The Big Finish

Be prepared to cry, a lot.

I was a bit worried that I wouldn’t enjoy this book since it started off pretty slow but was pleased to find how attached I was to each of the characters at the half way point. I was also worried because at one point it seems like the days would be repeating themselves and I cant stand that. I was pleased to find each day brought something new for everyone.

I really loved all the characters that are introduced throughout the book whether the story revolves around them or not. I like the way that the relationship that Duffy has with Carl is played out and how it informs the relationship he feels the need to have with Josie. I really enjoy how Duffy forms a team to save Josie from herself and its so sweet watching as how each person on that team has a different role to play in Josie’s life.

Tunnel of Bones

I decided to listen to this one on audio since I had read the first book of this series in that method. The narrator in this series has a nice soothing voice which makes this book easy to listen to when I want to tune out the world. Something else that is great about listening to this series rather than reading it is how quickly I can get through them, it makes you feel like you are getting through a lot reading in a short amount of time.

I like how events of book one are referenced often throughout the start of this book so you know it is going to be building off of that story. I like that this is true sequel but you probably could also read it as a stand alone. While things from book one are referenced they are still explained clearly enough that you would understand if you haven’t read book one.

Once a girl, always a boy

As someone who is transgender, it was nice to watch Jeremy’s family struggle to understand him. I tend to get frustrated by my family not understanding my gender or sexual identity and seeing all of Jeremy’s family react and learn gave me a new perspective. It taught me to give people some time to learn, especially the people who I know are trying and to listen to why they’re struggling with things related to my gender and sexuality.

This was a great book to be able to read during this stay at home order because it made me feel understood. This book uplifted me in moments that I was struggling with because living at home with a family who uses my legal name and misgenders me without having an escape from it gets rough. This book was a constant reminder that I decide my identity and even when others don’t see me that way my identity remains the same.

The Extraordinaries

It took me a while to get into this one as there are a lot of characters to keep track of. I had a hard time remembering which character is which and the relationships that they have with each other. Once I got past that and was about six chapters into the book I just couldn’t put it down. It’s like each of these characters have their secrets and you need to read to find out what they are. The characters are so sweet and the friendship that they have with each other is so caring and loving.

Something I really enjoyed was how you feel that you solved the mystery early on but this book keeps you invested because you have to know if your suspicions are correct. I love that at no point was I 100% sure that what I was suspecting was correct. The best part of this whole thing was the twist in the book that is close to the end and everything you thought you knew is twisted. I loved the whole book and the ending was great, cant wait for more.

Here in the Real World

Something that I look for when reading middle grade is that the characters read their age. If I am going to recommend books to middle graders I want them to be able to relate to the characters and the things that they are going through. I have several cousins that are in the middle grade age range and love being able to recommend things to them which is why I read this genre.

I really enjoy the level of imagination and wonder that was included in this book. The book is recommended for grades 3-7 which is ages 8-12, and I think that the level of imagination and wonder that these characters have is great for that age. I like how these two kids are the outcasts of their age group and don’t feel like they fit in anywhere. This lack of belonging strengthens their friendship with each other and makes these two kids understand each other better.

March Wrap Up

I got through a good amount of books this month and wanted to share with you all what I got a chance to read. I’m hoping that I can get through a lot more in April with this quarantine. Each link takes you to my full review of the book on my blog, if there is no link I have yet to publish those reviews as those books have yet to be published.

A Home for Goddesses and Dogs

Last year I was able to read a lot of middle grade books that really enjoyed them so I was hoping the enjoy a lot this year as well. Unfortunately I just haven’t been reading as much physical books as I would like to and I don’t really enjoy middle grade as audiobooks. I’m glad that I picked this one up though since it seems to have taken me out of the reading slump that I had been in.

I really enjoyed the characters in this book, both the animals and the humans that were included. I really enjoy having dogs in books because I think that they bring something out of the people that I really like. I like when there is a similarity between the dog and the humans which in this case was how they were both brought in around the same time. I think that fact adds to how Lydia relates to this dog and how she views herself in this home.

Queens of Geek

This one was recommended by a fellow bibliophile on twitter and the recommendation came just in time. I love to read books about pandemics, epidemics, outbreaks, and more but right now not even those can make me happy. I feel like my anxiety has gone up and just won’t come down and my depression went right along with it but this book has made my days a little brighter. This book has made me feel like I’m not alone.

Something that really made me love this book is the LGBTQ+ representation along with the fact that they have an autistic character. I love that both of the characters bring up the challenges that they face because of their identity, it makes them so much more relatable. I think that they tackled some of the important issues regarding sexuality with one of the characters being bisexual and how her ex feels about it. I also think that the autistic representation was done well and I really enjoyed when Taylor meets another autistic girl and is overwhelmed with emotions.

Non-Binary Lives – An Anthology of Intersecting Identities

I tend to have a hard time reviewing books that are about real people’s lives because these are personal stories and how do you decide if you like them or not. I focus a lot more on the style of the book and its structure to decide how I feel rather than the content when it comes to these types of writings.

As I decided to skip the introduction and read that once I was done with all the stories I was thrilled to get a chance to read this book. I really appreciated each individual’s vulnerability in putting their story on paper for others to see. I thought it was important that each story was unique and that they were all told in different manners.

Something that did throw me off was that it was written in a way that isn’t accessible to everyone. It’s written in a way that is meant for individuals who have access to education. I think this is important to note especially for a book that others may recommend to people who are new to understanding what non-binary means. I don’t think this is a book that can be used to help educate others on non-binary matters as there were parts that I didn’t understand.

The List of Things That Will Not Change

I really enjoy when middle-grade books feature a character that acts their age and in which you can see their growth as they mature and encounter different obstacles. This was something that I felt was captured well in this book, I think it was great to see how Bea changed over time and how she recalled a lot of the big events in her life.

Something else that I enjoyed in this book was the way that emotions were captured and handled. I enjoyed the moments that Bea has with her therapist, Miriam, as it gives a great way to handle certain emotions and I think it begins to normalize therapy for those who are reading this. I like that this book addresses mental health and in a way, it addresses anxiety and normalizes worrying to a certain extent.

Something else that I really enjoyed was the way Mission not accepting his brother due to his sexuality was handled. I think the homophobia in this book was handled well and it was appropriate for the ages it is written for. It was written in a way that is realistic but also in a way that shows compassion and how you will have people who support you and those are the ones who matter.

City of Ghosts

I really enjoy getting a chance to read stories with ghosts that are friendly and have a human-like personality. I liked hearing about the adventures that Jacob and Cass are going on and the trouble that they get themselves into. I really enjoy the friendship that they have with each other and how that friendship continues even if Jacob is a ghost.

Something else that I enjoy in this book is how the adults support Cass in her friendship with Jacob and in her pursuit of ghosts. I think it was nice to see how her parents were so fascinated by the supernatural while Cass was the only one who could communicate with ghosts and they had no idea. I enjoyed all of the adults that Cass comes into contact with both in the veil and in the real world.

I also really enjoy the way that the truth unravels and how as the reader you are also learning along with Cass. I liked hearing about Cass being in the veil and her feelings while she’s in there. I think you get a good glimpse into what a teenager would feel like being in this world and how it changes her perspective on life.

There are two books that I read that I didn’t really write a review for it because it just wasn’t that good. Those books are Highfire and My Ex-Life.

February TBR

I had no clue what I wanted to read for this month but I knew I wanted to read more books by Black authors as it is Black History Month. These are a few of the books that I want to prioritze this month and there’s many more not pictured.

Pet by Akwaeke Emezi

Pet is here to hunt a monster.
Are you brave enough to look?

There are no more monsters anymore, or so the children in the city of Lucille are taught. With doting parents and a best friend named Redemption, Jam has grown up with this lesson all her life. But when she meets Pet, a creature made of horns and colours and claws, who emerges from one of her mother’s paintings and a drop of Jam’s blood, she must reconsider what she’s been told. Pet has come to hunt a monster, and the shadow of something grim lurks in Redemption’s house. Jam must fight not only to protect her best friend, but also to uncover the truth, and the answer to the question-How do you save the world from monsters if no one will admit they exist?

In their riveting and timely young adult debut, acclaimed novelist Akwaeke Emezi asks difficult questions about what choices a young person can make when the adults around them are in denial.

How to Be Remy Cameron by Julian Winters

Everyone on campus knows Remy Cameron. He’s the out-and-gay, super-likable guy that people admire for his confidence. The only person who may not know Remy that well is Remy himself. So when he is assigned to write an essay describing himself, he goes on a journey to reconcile the labels that people have attached to him, and get to know the real Remy Cameron.

From the Desk of Zoe Washington by Janae Marks 

Zoe Washington isn’t sure what to write. What does a girl say to the father she’s never met, hadn’t heard from until his letter arrived on her twelfth birthday, and who’s been in prison for a terrible crime?

A crime he says he never committed.

Could Marcus really be innocent? Zoe is determined to uncover the truth. Even if it means hiding his letters and her investigation from the rest of her family. Everyone else thinks Zoe’s worrying about doing a good job at her bakery internship and proving to her parents that she’s worthy of auditioning for Food Network’s Kids Bake Challenge.

But with bakery confections on one part of her mind, and Marcus’s conviction weighing heavily on the other, this is one recipe Zoe doesn’t know how to balance. The only thing she knows to be true: Everyone lies.

The Girl with the Louding Voice by Abi Dare

Adunni is a fourteen-year-old Nigerian girl who knows what she wants: an education. This, her mother has told her, is the only way to get a “louding voice”–the ability to speak for herself and decide her own future. But instead, Adunni’s father sells her to be the third wife of a local man who is eager for her to bear him a son and heir.

When Adunni runs away to the city, hoping to make a better life, she finds that the only other option before her is servitude to a wealthy family. As a yielding daughter, a subservient wife, and a powerless slave, Adunni is told, by words and deeds, that she is nothing.

But while misfortunes might muffle her voice for a time, they cannot mute it. And when she realizes that she must stand up not only for herself, but for other girls, for the ones who came before her and were lost, and for the next girls, who will inevitably follow; she finds the resolve to speak, however she can–in a whisper, in song, in broken English–until she is heard.

Pan’s Labyrinth: The Labyrinth of the Faun by Guillermo del Toro, Cornelia Funke

Fans of dark fairy-tales like The Hazel Wood and The Cruel Prince will relish this atmospheric and absorbing book based on Guillermo del Toro’s critically acclaimed movie.

Oscar winning writer-director Guillermo del Toro and New York Times bestselling author Cornelia Funke have come together to transform del Toro’s hit movie Pan’s Labyrinth into an epic and dark fantasy novel for readers of all ages, complete with haunting illustrations and enchanting short stories that flesh out the folklore of this fascinating world.

This spellbinding tale takes readers to a sinister, magical, and war-torn world filled with richly drawn characters like trickster fauns, murderous soldiers, child-eating monsters, courageous rebels, and a long-lost princess hoping to be reunited with her family.

January TBR

I just realized that I didn’t create a TBR for January, well more like I did but forgot to share it with you all. So I know this is a little late but here goes since I told you I’d keep you updated on my challenges.

Highfire by Eoin Colfer

In the days of yore, he flew the skies and scorched angry mobs—now he hides from swamp tour boats and rises only with the greatest reluctance from his Laz-Z-Boy recliner. Laying low in the bayou, this once-magnificent fire breather has been reduced to lighting Marlboros with nose sparks, swilling Absolut in a Flashdance T-shirt, and binging Netflix in a fishing shack. For centuries, he struck fear in hearts far and wide as Wyvern, Lord Highfire of the Highfire Eyrie—now he goes by Vern. However…he has survived, unlike the rest. He is the last of his kind, the last dragon. Still, no amount of vodka can drown the loneliness in his molten core. Vern’s glory days are long gone. Or are they?

A canny Cajun swamp rat, young Everett “Squib” Moreau does what he can to survive, trying not to break the heart of his saintly single mother. He’s finally decided to work for a shady smuggler—but on his first night, he witnesses his boss murdered by a crooked constable.

Regence Hooke is not just a dirty cop, he’s a despicable human being—who happens to want Squib’s momma in the worst way. When Hooke goes after his hidden witness with a grenade launcher, Squib finds himself airlifted from certain death by…a dragon?

The swamp can make strange bedfellows, and rather than be fried alive so the dragon can keep his secret, Squib strikes a deal with the scaly apex predator. He can act as his go-between (aka familiar)—fetch his vodka, keep him company, etc.—in exchange for protection from Hooke. Soon the three of them are careening headlong toward a combustible confrontation. There’s about to be a fiery reckoning, in which either dragons finally go extinct—or Vern’s glory days are back.

Big Lies in a Small Town by Diane Chamberlain

North Carolina, 2018: Morgan Christopher’s life has been derailed. Taking the fall for a crime she did not commit, she finds herself serving a three-year stint in the North Carolina Women’s Correctional Center. Her dream of a career in art is put on hold—until a mysterious visitor makes her an offer that will see her released immediately. Her assignment: restore an old post office mural in a sleepy southern town. Morgan knows nothing about art restoration, but desperate to leave prison, she accepts. What she finds under the layers of grime is a painting that tells the story of madness, violence, and a conspiracy of small town secrets.

North Carolina, 1940: Anna Dale, an artist from New Jersey, wins a national contest to paint a mural for the post office in Edenton, North Carolina. Alone in the world and desperate for work, she accepts. But what she doesn’t expect is to find herself immersed in a town where prejudices run deep, where people are hiding secrets behind closed doors, and where the price of being different might just end in murder.

What happened to Anna Dale? Are the clues hidden in the decrepit mural? Can Morgan overcome her own demons to discover what exists beneath the layers of lies? 

From the Desk of Zoe Washington by Janae Marks

Zoe Washington isn’t sure what to write. What does a girl say to the father she’s never met, hadn’t heard from until his letter arrived on her twelfth birthday, and who’s been in prison for a terrible crime?

A crime he says he never committed.

Could Marcus really be innocent? Zoe is determined to uncover the truth. Even if it means hiding his letters and her investigation from the rest of her family. Everyone else thinks Zoe’s worrying about doing a good job at her bakery internship and proving to her parents that she’s worthy of auditioning for Food Network’s Kids Bake Challenge.

But with bakery confections on one part of her mind, and Marcus’s conviction weighing heavily on the other, this is one recipe Zoe doesn’t know how to balance. The only thing she knows to be true: Everyone lies. 

We Come Apart by Sarah Crossan

Authors Brian Conaghan and Sarah Crossan have joined forces to tell the story of Nicu and Jess, two troubled teens whose paths cross in the unlikeliest of places.

Nicu has emigrated from Romania and is struggling to find his place in his new home. Meanwhile, Jess’s home life is overshadowed by violence. When Nicu and Jess meet, what starts out as friendship grows into romance as the two bond over their painful pasts and hopeful futures. But will they be able to save each other, let alone themselves?
For fans of Una LaMarche’s Like No Other, this illuminating story told in dual points of view through vibrant verse will stay with readers long after they’ve turned the last page.

All descriptions come from Goodreads and you can get all of these books at Barnes and Noble. Stay tuned at the end of the month to see what I actually read throughout January.

2020 Book Challenges

I’ve always seen book challenges floating around and have always been intimidated by them. Because of that I’ve only ever participated in the Goodreads challenge so this year I found 3 that I want to try.

Armed with a Bingo by Aruel and Kriti

52 books in 52 weeks on Goodreads

1. A book with a title that doesn’t contain the letters A, T or Y
2. A book by an author whose last name is one syllable
3. A book that you are prompted to read because of something you read in 2019
4. A book set in a place or time that you wouldn’t want to live
5. The first book in a series that you have not started

6. A book with a mode of transportation on the cover
7. A book set in the southern hemisphere
8. A book with a two-word title where the first word is “The”
9. A book that can be read in a day

10. A book that is between 400-600 pages
11. A book originally published in a year that is a prime number
12. A book that is a collaboration between 2 or more people
13. A prompt from a previous Around the Year in 52 Books challenge (Link)
14. A book by an author on the Abe List of 100 Essential Female Writers (link)

15. A book set in a global city
16. A book set in a rural or sparsely populated area
17. A book with a neurodiverse character
18. A book by an author you’ve only read once before

19. A fantasy book
20. The 20th book [on your TBR, in a series, by an author, on a list, etc.]
21. A book related to Maximilian Hell, the noted astronomer and Jesuit Priest who was born in 1720
22. A book with the major theme of survival

23. A book featuring an LGBTQIA+ character or by an LGBTQIA+ author
24. A book with an emotion in the title
25. A book related to the arts
26. A book from the 2019 Goodreads Choice Awards
27. A history or historical fiction

28. A book by an Australian, Canadian or New Zealand author
29. An underrated book, a hidden gem or a lesser known book
30. A book from the New York Times ‘100 Notable Books’ list for any year
31. A book inspired by a leading news story

32. A book related to the 2020 Olympic Summer Games in Japan
33. A book about a non-traditional family
34. A book from a genre or sub genre that starts with a letter in your name
35. A book with a geometric pattern or element on the cover

36. A book from your TBR/wishlist that you don’t recognize, recall putting there, or put there on a whim
37. Two books that are related to each other as a pair of binary opposites: Book #1
38. Two books that are related to each other as a pair of binary opposites: Book #2
39. A book by an author whose real name(s) you’re not quite sure how to pronounce

40. A book with a place name in the title
41. A mystery
42. A book that was nominated for one of the ‘10 Most Coveted Literary Prizes in the World’ (link)
43. A book related to one of the four horsemen of the apocalypse
44. A book related to witches

45. A book by the same author who wrote one of your best reads in 2019 or 2018
46. A book about an event or era in history taken from the Billy Joel song “We Didn’t Start the Fire”
47. A classic book you’ve always meant to read
48. A book published in 2020

49. A book that fits a prompt from the list of suggestions that didn’t win (link)
50. A book with a silhouette on the cover
51. A book with an “-ing” word in the title
52. A book related to time

Book Riot’s Read Harder Challenge

Click the follow button if you want updates on my reading challenges throughout the year. I’ll be updating you all monthly on how far I get with each challenge.