The Big Finish Book Review

GoodReads Summary: For Duffy Sinclair, life boils down to one simple thing: maintaining his residence at the idyllic Centennial Assisted Living. Without it, he’s destined for the roach-infested nursing home down the road—and after wasting the first eighty-eight years of his life, he refuses to waste away for the rest. So, he keeps his shenanigans to the bare minimum with the help of his straight-laced best friend and roommate, Carl Upton.

But when Carl’s granddaughter Josie climbs through their bedroom window with booze on her breath and a black eye, Duffy’s faced with trouble that’s sticking around and hard to hide—from Centennial’s management and Josie’s toxic boyfriend. Before he knows it, he’s running a covert operation that includes hitchhiking and barhopping.

He might as well write himself a one-way ticket to the nursing home…or the morgue. Yet Duffy’s all in. Because thanks to an unlikely friendship that becomes fast family—his life doesn’t boil down the same anymore. Not when he finally has a chance to leave a legacy.

Have the tissues ready when you read this book

Thoughts: Thank you to Berkley Books and Penguin Random House for the advanced copy of this book in exchange for my review.

I was a bit worried that I wouldn’t enjoy this book since it started off pretty slow but was pleased to find how attached I was to each of the characters at the half way point. I was also worried because at one point it seems like the days would be repeating themselves and I cant stand that. I was pleased to find each day brought something new for everyone.

You get introduced to the characters slowly throughout the events of one day and this is where you start to get to know who Duffy was before he lived in the assisted living facility. As you get to know Duffy you begin to understand the connection that he is going to have with Josie, whom is Carl’s Granddaughter. It is during these moments in which I got invested in the story as I wanted to know if these two would wind up saving each other.

I really loved all the characters that are introduced throughout the book whether the story revolves around them or not. I like the way that the relationship that Duffy has with Carl is played out and how it informs the relationship he feels the need to have with Josie. I really enjoy how Duffy forms a team to save Josie from herself and its so sweet watching as how each person on that team has a different role to play in Josie’s life.

I really enjoyed the writing style of this book as I felt that I was in the room as Duffy was telling me the story of when he met Josie. It’s a nice, slow read that reminds me of the stories my grandma tells me sometimes. There’s some funny moments throughout this book and then there are some more serious moments yet both of these make the book a pleasure to read.

I recommend this to those of you who enjoy books with little to no action scenes, books with characters to love, or books that feel like home .

Starting today you can get this book at Barnes and Noble, IndieBound, or look for it at your local library.

City of Ghosts Book Review

Summary: Cassidy Blake’s parents are The Inspecters, a (somewhat inept) ghost-hunting team. But Cass herself can REALLY see ghosts. In fact, her best friend, Jacob, just happens to be one.

When The Inspecters head to ultra-haunted Edinburgh, Scotland, for their new TV show, Cass—and Jacob—come along. In Scotland, Cass is surrounded by ghosts, not all of them friendly. Then she meets Lara, a girl who can also see the dead. But Lara tells Cassidy that as an In-betweener, their job is to send ghosts permanently beyond the Veil. Cass isn’t sure about her new mission, but she does know the sinister Red Raven haunting the city doesn’t belong in her world. Cassidy’s powers will draw her into an epic fight that stretches through the worlds of the living and the dead, in order to save herself. 

Thoughts: I’ve been listening to a lot of young adult books on audio since they are easy to get through and I can go through them faster this way. I thought that since young adult on audio was good I might as well also listen to middle grade since I enjoy reading those as well. I’m glad that I listened to this one on audio as it was nice to hear.

I really enjoy getting a chance to read stories with ghosts that are friendly and have a human like personality. I liked hearing about the adventures that Jacob and Cass are going on and the trouble that they get themselves into. I really enjoy the friendship that they have with each other and how that friendship continues even if Jacob is a ghost.

Something else that I enjoy in this book is how the adults support Cass in her friendship with Jacob and in her pursuit of ghosts. I think it was nice to see how her parent’s were so fascinated by the supernatural while Cass was the only one who could communicate with ghosts and they had no idea. I enjoyed all of the adults that Cass comes into contact with both in the veil and in the real world.

I also really enjoy the way that the truth unravels and how as the reader you are also learning along with Cass. I liked hearing about Cass being in the veil and her feelings while she’s in there. I think you get a good glimpse into what a teenager would feel like being in this world and how it changes her perspective on life.

I recommend this to those of you who like paranormal books and those who are ages 10+. You can get this book at Barnes and Noble or IndieBound or look for it at your local library.

Lab Partners Book Review

Net Galley Summary: Sometimes you don’t know who you love, until they love you . . .

When Jordan Hughes arrives at Pinecrest High School, Elliot Goldman’s graduating year suddenly gets a lot more interesting. Smart, good looking and charming, Jordan isn’t exactly the kind of person Elliot’s used to having as a lab partner. But when they start acing their assignments, life is suddenly about more than boring lectures, bad cafeteria nachos, or relentless bullying, and for the first time ever, Elliot can’t wait to get to chemistry class.

As they start spending more time together outside of school, Elliot realizes he’s never met anyone quite like Jordan. And then everything changes one night when Jordan kisses him, making Elliot question everything about their relationship and about himself. The butterflies start to make sense―the trouble is, right now, nothing else does.

Love was the last thing on Elliot’s mind. But as he begins to figure out how he really feels about Jordan, he realizes that sometimes the last thing you are looking for is the one thing you need the most.

Thoughts: Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for the advanced copy of this book in exchange for my review.

I will always give a LGBTQ+ a try so this was no different. I’m glad I gave this a try, I really do love friends to lovers stories. While this was a cute love story there were parts that I couldn’t really enjoy.

While the start of the book was pretty slow and was giving a play by play of every day, there were some good parts. I really enjoyed the friendship that started between the two boys and how we dont get romance from the start. I liked how we got to know the boys families and lives outside of each other a little.

I enjoyed how these boys didnt have romantic feelings for each other from the start and how they were friends first. I liked watching their friendship develop over time and seeing them get to know each other. I loved that they still were getting to know each other as their relationship went on.

The discussion that Elliot has with his sister regarding sexuality seems out of place and something out of a textbook. The whole thing just doesnt flow and him just kind of accepting himself seems strange when just a few seconds ago he was freaking out. I spent some time thinking about it and realized it’s very similar to when I realized I was into girls, all it took was someone putting the thought into my head. I think while it reads strangely for some teenagers it really just kind of clicks the way it does for Elliot.

A lot of things kind of were skimmed over or just taken foregranted through the story and just felt out of place. I felt that some of the moments that should’ve taken more time were rushed through leaving little room for the reader to feel anything. I wanted there to be more room for Elliot to process things that were happening to him.

The ending just kind of infuriates me, I feel that there was a better way to deal with these bullies. I keep seeing YA books that deal with bullying in a similar manner, where the adults are useless so they seek revenge. I’m not a fan of this being the way to deal with things and the revenge sought in this book is a bit distasteful. I felt that the third thing they did was the only thing that should’ve been done and the rest was too much.

Once the problem of bullying is resolved the book kind of quickly speeds through. Each chapter is pretty short and reads like a slice of elliot’s life rather than the ending of a book. The ending really made me not enjoy the book as I wanted it to have more of a closing.

You can get this book at Barnes and Noble or look for it at your local library.

Bloodstream Book Review

Goodreads Summary: With her acclaimed novels Harvest and Life Support, Tess Gerritsen has injected a powerful dose of adrenaline into the medical thriller. Now, in a new blockbuster, Gerritsen melds page-turning suspense with chilling realism as a small-town doctor races to unravel the roots of a violent outbreak — before it destroys everything she loves.


Lapped by he gentle waters of Locust Lake, the small resort town of Tranquility, Maine, seems like the perfect spot for Dr. Claire Elliot to shelter her adolescent son, Noah, from the distractions of the big city and the lingering memory of his father’s death. But with the first snap of winter comes shocking news that puts her practise on the line: a teenage boy under her care has committed an appalling act of violence. And as Claire and all of Tranquility soon discover, it is just the start of a chain of lethal outbursts among the town’s teenagers.

As the rash of disturbing behavior grows, Claire uncovers a horrifying secret: this is not the first time it has happened. Twice a century,the children of Tranquility lash out with deadly violence. Claire suspects that there is a biological cause for the epidemic, and she fears that the placid Locust Lake may conceal an insidious danger. As she races to save Tranquility — and her son — from harm, Claire discovers an even greater threat: a shocking conspiracy to manipulate nature, and turn innocents to slaughter

Thoughts: I asked my sister for a audiobook recommendation and she said to try one from Tess Gerritson if I was a fan of medical things. I decided why not give it a try and I’m so happy I did.

This is one of those books that keeps you on your toes and if I was reading it in physical form I’d have to hide it in the closet. Unfortunately the thriller part of the book only kept me entertained for the first portion of the book.

There came a point as I was listening to this book that I no longer cared to solve the mystery. Even when the solution was revealed I didnt really care for it. It all made sense but it just was a bit boring for my taste. I didnt care for the repetitiveness of some things that occurred. While I am glad to have read this book it just didn’t really meet my expectations.

I recommend this to those of you who enjoy market paperbacks and thrillers. You can get this at a Barnes and Noble or look for it at your local library.

Pet Book Review

Goodreads Summary:

Pet is here to hunt a monster.
Are you brave enough to look?

There are no more monsters anymore, or so the children in the city of Lucille are taught. With doting parents and a best friend named Redemption, Jam has grown up with this lesson all her life. But when she meets Pet, a creature made of horns and colours and claws, who emerges from one of her mother’s paintings and a drop of Jam’s blood, she must reconsider what she’s been told. Pet has come to hunt a monster, and the shadow of something grim lurks in Redemption’s house. Jam must fight not only to protect her best friend, but also to uncover the truth, and the answer to the question-How do you save the world from monsters if no one will admit they exist?

Thoughts: I picked this one up since I was looking for a good short read and it did not disappoint. I wanted to make sure that I read books by black people or that featured black people this month.

I loved all of the characters involved in this story and how their relationships developed. I liked how much you got to know these characters in a short amount of time. I really enjoyed that Jam was selectively non verbal and how that was shown throughout the story. I also enjoy how there was brief mention that she is transgender but that wasnt the focus of the story, it was nice to have a trans protagonist but have the story be about something other than her gender.

I really like the idea of Angels and monsters in this book. I thought it was such a nice change from what were used to. I also really like how it was the children who were able to see the monsters for what they were. I think it was great to have them play such a large role in the rescue.

I recommend this to those of you who enjoy reading middle grade or young adult, and those of you who are looking for good lgbtq+ representation.

You can get this book at Barnes and Noble or look for it at your local library.

Bloom Book Review

Goodreads Summary: Now that high school is over, Ari is dying to move to the big city with his ultra-hip band—if he can just persuade his dad to let him quit his job at their struggling family bakery. Though he loved working there as a kid, Ari cannot fathom a life wasting away over rising dough and hot ovens. But while interviewing candidates for his replacement, Ari meets Hector, an easygoing guy who loves baking as much as Ari wants to escape it. As they become closer over batches of bread, love is ready to bloom . . . that is, if Ari doesn’t ruin everything.

Thoughts: I hardly read graphic novels not because I dont like them but because I dont know of any. I found this one at the library and since I had seen it on Instagram I decided to pick it up.

The art style is really cute and I like how easy the story it is to follow. It’s easy to follow the tragetictery of the main characters and their development. I like how their friendship develops along with Ari’s character development.

I also enjoy the ways in which the bakery plays a role in this story and the importance that is placed on family. This is a cute coming of age graphic novel in which the main character figures out things about himself.

I wasnt a big fan of the ending of this book though. Things felt quick and unresolved so I wanted a little more from it.

I recommend this to those of you who enjoy graphic novels or those looking for a cute LGBTQ story to read. You can get this book at Barnes and Noble or look for it at your local library.

We Contain Multitudes Book Review

Goodreads Summary: Jonathan Hopkirk and Adam “Kurl” Kurlansky are partnered in English class, writing letters to one another in a weekly pen pal assignment. With each letter, the two begin to develop a friendship that eventually grows into love. But with homophobia, bullying, and devastating family secrets, Jonathan and Kurl struggle to overcome their conflicts and hold onto their relationship…and each other.

Thoughts: While I loved this story its important to let you all know about some triggers in this book. Theres homophobia, abuse, relationships between a 15 year old and an 18 year old, and bullying. It’s a lot for the age it’s intended for and 3/4 into the story it gets pretty bad for everyone in the story.

I randomly pulled this off the shelves at the library and then decided to listen to the audiobook instead. I’m glad I did because it brought both characters to life for me. It allowed me to see these characters and they’re now in my head rather than just on paper.

I loved how this story was told through these characters letters to each other. I also liked how these letters are read by whoever wrote it, well at least that’s how it felt to me. I love how these letters that were a class assignment lead to a lot more for these boys lives.

I love all the emotions that the characters go through and how you can see them struggle through their feelings. The whole thing felt realistic for the ages that the characters are. I love how their emotions are scattered all over the place and how they go back and forth with each other. It makes me hate them and love them at the same time.

I like how you slowly find out Adam’s story and what’s going on in his life. I like how you see him struggle with his feelings and then struggle with other things happening. I also like how Jonathan helps him through everything and wants to rescue him. I like how after hearing curls story you start hearing more about Jonathan’s background. Ultimately what I love is that this book is much more than what you think it first is.

I have a love hate relationship with people who are “broken” and feel like they dont deserve to love and be loved. They remind me of myself and seeing them in that fear of letting that love happen makes me cry. I feel for Adam so much and just want him to be okay through the whole thing and wish he didnt push people away.

I highly recommend this to those of you who enjoy young adult coming of age books and those of you who are looking for LGBTQ+ books to read.

You can get this book at Barnes and Noble or look for it at your local library.

Five Feet Apart Book Review

Goodreads Summary: Stella Grant likes to be in control—even though her totally out of control lungs have sent her in and out of the hospital most of her life. At this point, what Stella needs to control most is keeping herself away from anyone or anything that might pass along an infection and jeopardize the possibility of a lung transplant. Six feet apart. No exceptions.

The only thing Will Newman wants to be in control of is getting out of this hospital. He couldn’t care less about his treatments, or a fancy new clinical drug trial. Soon, he’ll turn eighteen and then he’ll be able to unplug all these machines and actually go see the world, not just its hospitals.

Will’s exactly what Stella needs to stay away from. If he so much as breathes on Stella she could lose her spot on the transplant list. Either one of them could die. The only way to stay alive is to stay apart. But suddenly six feet doesn’t feel like safety. It feels like punishment.

What if they could steal back just a little bit of the space their broken lungs have stolen from them? Would five feet apart really be so dangerous if it stops their hearts from breaking too?

Thoughts: I know that a movie is never better than a book and they ever hardly come close so since I saw the movie before this book I made sure to try and read with no expectations. Even though I knew what was coming the story still had the same impact as if I hadn’t already seen the movie.

I love each of the characters in this book. You get a chance to really get emotionally attached to Will, Stella, and Poe. I love getting to know everyone’s personal story and their lives outside of each other. I liked that we got to even see some of Poes life through Stella’s eyes.

Something else I enjoy in this book was that it switched between two different perspectives. A voice was given to both Stella and Will, and I loved that the voices were distinct. I love that while both characters develop and grow they still are themselves throughout the whole story. The changes they go through dont make them completely new people.

I recommend this to those of you looking for a cute yet sad love story and those of you who enjoy reading YA fiction. If you’ve enjoyed the movie then I’m sure you’ll love this book.

You can get this book at Barnes and Noble or look for it at your local library.

2020 Books to read for Black History Month

I felt like every time I read a book that starred a black characters the premise was the same, it was always about police brutality. I want to read books that show another story for black people since I know they dont just have one narrative so I went and looked for them. Here are a few that I’ve enjoyed or plan on reading this month and throughout the year. Click the titles for my full review of the books. You can check out my instagram this month for more books written by black authors.

Red at The Bone by Jaqueline Woodson

Moving forward and backward in time, Jacqueline Woodson’s taut and powerful new novel uncovers the role that history and community have played in the experiences, decisions, and relationships of these families, and in the life of the new child.

As the book opens in 2001, it is the evening of sixteen-year-old Melody’s coming of age ceremony in her grandparents’ Brooklyn brownstone. Watched lovingly by her relatives and friends, making her entrance to the music of Prince, she wears a special custom-made dress. But the event is not without poignancy. Sixteen years earlier, that very dress was measured and sewn for a different wearer: Melody’s mother, for her own ceremony– a celebration that ultimately never took place.

Unfurling the history of Melody’s parents and grandparents to show how they all arrived at this moment, Woodson considers not just their ambitions and successes but also the costs, the tolls they’ve paid for striving to overcome expectations and escape the pull of history. As it explores sexual desire and identity, ambition, gentrification, education, class and status, and the life-altering facts of parenthood, Red at the Bone most strikingly looks at the ways in which young people must so often make long-lasting decisions about their lives–even before they have begun to figure out who they are and what they want to be.

The Revolution of Birdie Randolph by Brandy Colbert

Dove “Birdie” Randolph works hard to be the perfect daughter and follow the path her parents have laid out for her: She quit playing her beloved soccer, she keeps her nose buried in textbooks, and she’s on track to finish high school at the top of her class. But then Birdie falls hard for Booker, a sweet boy with a troubled past…whom she knows her parents will never approve of.

When her estranged aunt Carlene returns to Chicago and moves into the family’s apartment above their hair salon, Birdie notices the tension building at home. Carlene is sweet, friendly, and open-minded–she’s also spent decades in and out of treatment facilities for addiction. As Birdie becomes closer to both Booker and Carlene, she yearns to spread her wings. But when long-buried secrets rise to the surface, everything she’s known to be true is turned upside down.

My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithewaite

When Korede’s dinner is interrupted one night by a distress call from her sister, Ayoola, she knows what’s expected of her: bleach, rubber gloves, nerves of steel and a strong stomach. This’ll be the third boyfriend Ayoola’s dispatched in, quote, self-defence and the third mess that her lethal little sibling has left Korede to clear away. She should probably go to the police for the good of the menfolk of Nigeria, but she loves her sister and, as they say, family always comes first. Until, that is, Ayoola starts dating the doctor where Korede works as a nurse. Korede’s long been in love with him, and isn’t prepared to see him wind up with a knife in his back: but to save one would mean sacrificing the other…

A Song Below Water by Bethany C. Morrow

Tavia is already at odds with the world, forced to keep her siren identity under wraps in a society that wants to keep her kind under lock and key. Never mind she’s also stuck in Portland, Oregon, a city with only a handful of black folk and even fewer of those with magical powers. At least she has her bestie Effie by her side as they tackle high school drama, family secrets, and unrequited crushes.

But everything changes in the aftermath of a siren murder trial that rocks the nation; the girls’ favorite Internet fashion icon reveals she’s also a siren, and the news rips through their community. Tensions escalate when Effie starts being haunted by demons from her past, and Tavia accidentally lets out her magical voice during a police stop. No secret seems safe anymore—soon Portland won’t be either.

The Stars and the Blackness Between Them by Junauda Petrus

Trinidad. Sixteen-year-old Audre is despondent, having just found out she’s going to be sent to live in America with her father because her strictly religious mother caught her with her secret girlfriend, the pastor’s daughter. Audre’s grandmother Queenie (a former dancer who drives a white convertible Cadillac and who has a few secrets of her own) tries to reassure her granddaughter that she won’t lose her roots, not even in some place called Minneapolis. “America have dey spirits too, believe me,” she tells Audre.

Minneapolis. Sixteen-year-old Mabel is lying on her bed, staring at the ceiling and trying to figure out why she feels the way she feels–about her ex Terrell, about her girl Jada and that moment they had in the woods, and about the vague feeling of illness that’s plagued her all summer. Mabel’s reverie is cut short when her father announces that his best friend and his just-arrived-from-Trinidad daughter are coming for dinner.

Mabel quickly falls hard for Audre and is determined to take care of her as she tries to navigate an American high school. But their romance takes a turn when test results reveal exactly why Mabel has been feeling low-key sick all summer and suddenly it’s Audre who is caring for Mabel as she faces a deeply uncertain future.

The Water Dancerby Ta-Nehisi Coates

Young Hiram Walker was born into bondage. When his mother was sold away, Hiram was robbed of all memory of her—but was gifted with a mysterious power. Years later, when Hiram almost drowns in a river, that same power saves his life. This brush with death births an urgency in Hiram and a daring scheme: to escape from the only home he’s ever known.

So begins an unexpected journey that takes Hiram from the corrupt grandeur of Virginia’s proud plantations to desperate guerrilla cells in the wilderness, from the coffin of the deep South to dangerously utopic movements in the North. Even as he’s enlisted in the underground war between slavers and the enslaved, Hiram’s resolve to rescue the family he left behind endures.

Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

They killed my mother.
They took our magic.
They tried to bury us.

Now we rise.

Zélie Adebola remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. Burners ignited flames, Tiders beckoned waves, and Zélie’s Reaper mother summoned forth souls.

But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, maji were killed, leaving Zélie without a mother and her people without hope.

Now Zélie has one chance to bring back magic and strike against the monarchy. With the help of a rogue princess, Zélie must outwit and outrun the crown prince, who is hell-bent on eradicating magic for good.

Danger lurks in Orïsha, where snow leoponaires prowl and vengeful spirits wait in the waters. Yet the greatest danger may be Zélie herself as she struggles to control her powers and her growing feelings for an enemy.

Books by Latinx Authors about Immigration

There’s a book coming out soon that I will not be reading because I want to listen to #ownvoices reviews on this book and the feelings it causes through my community. As a Latinx person who doesn’t share the immigrant experience I feel it part of my responsibility to listen to those who have that experience, and to read reviews written by them especially if a book is talking about their experience. It is even more of our responsibility to listen to #ownvoices when the book isn’t written by someone who shares that experience. It was because of that I decided to create a post that highlights books by Latinx authors.

Lost Children Archive by Valeria Luiselli

From the two-time NBCC Finalist, an emotionally resonant, fiercely imaginative new novel about a family whose road trip across America collides with an immigration crisis at the southwestern border–an indelible journey told with breathtaking imagery, spare lyricism, and profound humanity.

A mother and father set out with their two children, a boy and a girl, driving from New York to Arizona in the heat of summer. Their destination: Apacheria, the place the Apaches once called home.

Why Apaches? asks the ten-year-old son. Because they were the last of something, answers his father.

In their car, they play games and sing along to music. But on the radio, there is news about an “immigration crisis”: thousands of kids trying to cross the southwestern border into the United States, but getting detained–or lost in the desert along the way.

As the family drives–through Virginia to Tennessee, across Oklahoma and Texas–we sense they are on the brink of a crisis of their own. A fissure is growing between the parents, one the children can almost feel beneath their feet. They are led, inexorably, to a grand, harrowing adventure–both in the desert landscape and within the chambers of their own imaginations.

Ordinary Girls by Jaquira Díaz

Ordinary Girls is a fierce, beautiful, and unflinching memoir from a wildly talented debut author. While growing up in housing projects in Puerto Rico and Miami Beach, Jaquira Díaz found herself caught between extremes: as her family split apart and her mother battled schizophrenia, she was surrounded by the love of her friends; as she longed for a family and home, she found instead a life upended by violence. From her own struggles with depression and sexual assault to Puerto Rico’s history of colonialism, every page of Ordinary Girls vibrates with music and lyricism. Díaz triumphantly maps a way out of despair toward love and hope to become her version of the girl she always wanted to be.

The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristina Henriquez

A dazzling, heartbreaking page-turner destined for breakout status: a novel that gives voice to millions of Americans as it tells the story of the love between a Panamanian boy and a Mexican girl: teenagers living in an apartment block of immigrant families like their own.

After their daughter Maribel suffers a near-fatal accident, the Riveras leave México and come to America. But upon settling at Redwood Apartments, a two-story cinderblock complex just off a highway in Delaware, they discover that Maribel’s recovery–the piece of the American Dream on which they’ve pinned all their hopes–will not be easy. Every task seems to confront them with language, racial, and cultural obstacles.

At Redwood also lives Mayor Toro, a high school sophomore whose family arrived from Panamá fifteen years ago. Mayor sees in Maribel something others do not: that beyond her lovely face, and beneath the damage she’s sustained, is a gentle, funny, and wise spirit. But as the two grow closer, violence casts a shadow over all their futures in America.

In the Country We Love: My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero, Michelle Burford

Diane Guerrero, the television actress from the megahit Orange is the New Black and Jane the Virgin, was just fourteen years old on the day her parents and brother were arrested and deported while she was at school. Born in the U.S., Guerrero was able to remain in the country and continue her education, depending on the kindness of family friends who took her in and helped her build a life and a successful acting career for herself, without the support system of her family.

In the Country We Love is a moving, heartbreaking story of one woman’s extraordinary resilience in the face of the nightmarish struggles of undocumented residents in this country. There are over 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the US, many of whom have citizen children, whose lives here are just as precarious, and whose stories haven’t been told. Written with Michelle Burford, this memoir is a tale of personal triumph that also casts a much-needed light on the fears that haunt the daily existence of families likes the author’s and on a system that fails them over and over. 

Which books do you all recommend?