YA BOTM- Best Deal of the Year

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I’m always hesitant to subscribe to anything monthly because what if I don’t like it or what if I wind up getting too much of something? I’ve had monthly subscriptions to make-up boxes before and had to stop them because it wasn’t working out, same with clothes. When I found BOTM I had the same skepticism about it even with the ability to skip a month and not get charged, I don’t really read adult fiction so the chances of me wanting a book in their selection was slim.

You can imagine my surprise when they announced a new subscription box that was going to be focused all on YA books, now that was right up my alley. I loved this subscription box idea so much that I became an affiliate with them so that I could spread the word of this box to all of you.

Let me tell you all how it works, each month you pay $11.99 to select one book from the 5 choices that they give you, and if you like you can add more books to your box. If by any chance you don’t see something that you like then skip the month and you won’t be charged.

The best thing is right now up until December 31st they have a great special going on for new subscribers, just CLICK HERE and use the code YES5 . If you would like to get a 6 or 12 month gift for yourselves or someone else use code GIFTY to get $10 off.

The Witches Are Coming Book Review

Thank you to Hachette Books and Shelf Awareness for the advanced copy of the book in exchange for my review.

Summary: (Borrowed from Barnes and Noble) From the moment powerful men started falling to the #MeToo movement, the lamentations began: this is feminism gone too far, this is injustice, this is a witch hunt. In The Witches Are Coming, firebrand author of the New York Times bestselling memoir and now critically acclaimed Hulu TV series Shrill, Lindy West, turns that refrain on its head. You think this is a witch hunt? Fine. You’ve got one.

In a laugh-out-loud, incisive cultural critique, West extolls the world-changing magic of truth, urging readers to reckon with dark lies in the heart of the American mythos, and unpacking the complicated, and sometimes tragic, politics of not being a white man in the 21st century. She tracks the misogyny and propaganda hidden (or not so hidden) in the media she and her peers devoured growing up, a buffet of distortions, delusions, prejudice, and outright bullsh*t that has allowed white male mediocrity to maintain a death grip on American culture and politics–and that delivered us to this precarious, disorienting moment in history.

Thoughts: This book was one I was worried wouldnt keep my attention or that the humor would be something I couldn’t grasp. You see satire and irony are the two types of humor that can be hit or miss for me. I was pleasantly surprised though and really enjoyed this book. I found so many aspects of it relatable and because of that it had it’s funny moments.

I loved how each chapter was a different topic but they all tied together well. I really enjoyed how it wasnt just a humorous book but I learned something in each chapter. I was forced to stop and think about things that I thought I hadn’t formed an opinion about.

I loved that it was dark humor. I liked that some of these were not things people find funny. And how the most humorous things were that it was sarcastic. So much of it was funny because it’s TRUE.

I recommend this book to everyone because I think woman can find some solidarity in these essays and everyone else can learn some compassion.

You can get this book at Barnes and Noble or look for it at your local library.